The Resilience Research Centre // rrc@dal.ca // +1 902 494 3050

What is Resilience?

Most commonly, the term resilience has come to mean an individual's ability to overcome adversity and continue his or her normal development. However, the RRC uses a more ecological and culturally sensitive definition. Dr. Michael Ungar, Co-Director of the RRC, has suggested that resilience is better understood as follows:

“In the context of exposure to significant adversity, resilience is both the capacity of individuals to navigate their way to the psychological, social, cultural, and physical resources that sustain their well-being, and their capacity individually and collectively to negotiate for these resources to be provided in culturally meaningful ways.” (See also Ungar, 2008 and Ungar, 2011)

Spaces & Places (2012-2014)

The Spaces and Places Research Project explores the ways in which communities can build better civic and cultural engagement with youth. A significant part of the research involved these youth creating arts-based dissemination projects to help give the findings back to local and broader communities.

The RRC Evaluation Tool Basket

The RRC has developed an easy to use Evaluation Tool Basket which is designed to help programs and organizations complete their own internal evaluation. The tools are written in plain-language and there are numerous tools included so that each program or organization can choose which ones are relevant to them. The RRC is also available for consultation.

Workshop: Researching Resilience

Presented by Dr. Michael Ungar and Dr. Linda Liebenberg, the workshop will present a comprehensive review of resilience theory as well as theoretical and methodological approaches (both quantitative and qualitative) to investigate the phenomenon across cultures and contexts. The workshop is designed to equip researchers in academic, government and NGO sectors, as well as graduate students, with the skills and tools to study resilience as a process across lifespans.

The workshop will be of special interest to those researching resilience with marginalised and vulnerable populations living in challenging contexts.

Pathways to Resilience (2007-2015)

Transitioning from one service to another can be a confusing and stressful process, especially for youth. The risks they face in the home or community, as well as their strengths and abilities impact what services youth are referred to. The Pathways to Resilience Project seeks to better understand how youth navigate between mandated services (child welfare, education, mental health, and youth justice) to successful outcomes.

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